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This Is the Best Country for Working Women

This Is the Best Country for Working Women

Over the past 10 years an extra quarter of a billion women are reported entering workplaces around the world but the World Economic Forum points out there is still much work to do to seal the gender gap.

According to the latest edition of the “Global Gender Gap Report” recently released by the World Economic Forum, Nordic nations fared the best worldwide in terms of achieving gender equality with Finland coming out on top as the best country for working women.

The “Global Gender Gap Report” measured averages of gender differences in wage, education, labor participation, childcare, and paid maternity leave for 10 years. The report also examined the share of women as parliament members, GMAT candidates, board members, and senior managers. Finland offered the highest scores followed by Sweden for women ages 25 to 64 years when it comes to higher education and the number of women in parliament. Finland, Norway, and Sweden also received the highest scores for gender parity in the labor force.

While the report indicated some progress towards gender equality, the data indicates there is still much work to be done around the world. Currently Norway mandates at least 40 percent of public limited company board members must be women now making it the country with the most females in boardrooms. However Norway still ranks low for the share of women in senior management positions and the U.S. takes the top spot with a 42.7 percent share of women as senior managers.

Turkey, Japan and South Korea had the lowest overall scores for achieving gender equality but they also held the highest scores in offering paid maternity leave ranking even higher than Norway, Canada, Denmark, Australia and New Zealand. In the U.S, women are still not entitled to paid maternity leave.

Out of the 109 nations covered in the report 104 made some progress in gender equality, but in five nations the gap actually widened.

We’re hoping world leaders work to end the gender gap because as proven time and time again, placing women in leadership roles is not only the right thing to do it is also smart for everyone.

Read the World Economic Forum's full "Global Gender Gap Report" here.

NEXT: 21 Facts You Never Knew About International Gender Inequality »

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Photo Credit: Michael Gottschalk/Photothek/Getty Images