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Asking Women to "Think Like a Man" Is the Worst Way to Celebrate National Women’s Day

Asking Women to "Think Like a Man" Is the Worst Way to Celebrate National Women’s Day

By Patricia Garcia


The offensive photo came under fire fast. Many took to Twitter to criticize its blatantly sexist message, with some even going so far as to create spoofs of the clueless message.

Bic South Africa, which claims it took the quote from a "Women in Business' blog, has since apologized on its Facebook page.

"Let's start out by saying we’re incredibly sorry for offending everybody — that was never our intention, but we completely understand where we've gone wrong. This post should never have gone out," its statement read.

This is not the first time Bic has incited the wrath of the general public.

Think back to 2011, when the company released its line of Bic for Her pens, pink-and-purple-colored lady-pens that generally cost more than a regular BicEllen DeGeneres hilariously mocked them during a monologue on her show, saying at one point, "They don't come with any instructions, so like, how do they expect us to learn how to write with them?" She even produced a parody commercial, in which she told a young girl to use the pens to "write down a grocery list or even recipes for when you need to feed your man." Sadly, the ad wasn't too far from Bic’s eventual TV spot, which showed a young girl rejecting black and blue pens, only to accept the "fabulous styling" of a pink Bic.

You would think that the response to Bic for Her would have been enough to inspire the company as a whole to rethink its marketing strategies, but its bizarrely antiquated sales approach remains. Bic still offers a number of pen products targeted "for women," like its Miss Bic line, which offers a range of pastel pens and pink pencils. (The troublesome Bic for Her pens are also still somehow in circulation.) With the news that Target will remove gender labels from all its toys, here’s hoping that Bic will soon follow suit.

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