Brazil-Based Program Helps Fathers to Reduce Cases of Domestic Violence

According to The Guardian, a father's involvement in childcare might help reduce cases of gender-based violence.

That theory is why people like Gary Barker founded Promundo, believing that men can help change this in countries like Brazil, where according to 2015's Map of Violence, a woman is killed every two hours.

"To us, it seemed obvious that we needed to figure out more constructive ways to engage men on this topic," Barker said.

Promundo engages men and boys in an effort to end violence against women. The initiative started in Brazil, but now works with 20 countries, and aims to be a global standard.

This, in hopes, will help close the gender gap in caretaking. The Guardian cites Promundo's 2015 State of the World's Fathers report, showing that women spend twice as much time on care and domestic work than men do.

Through initiatives in Promundo's umbrella, like bolsa familia cash transfer program, this not only helps economically disadvantaged families get their children through school successfully, but it also brings up the issue of "caregiving" and how to balance out the work for both parents.

"We worked with staff who implement that program to say, let's encourage him to be part of helping the child with homework, let's encourage him to go to the meetings with teachers," Barker said.

After a decade of work, bolsa familia's male participation with childcare went from 75 percent to 100 percent.

Similarly, Promundo improves paternal leave policies in Brazil as well. Men in Brazil are now able to take 20 days of paid parental leave, as opposed to five, the Guardian reports.

Barker hopes the rest of the world will follow suit with closing the gender gap on caregiving.

"There's a growing amount of evidence that if we can do this long enough and deep enough, and with enough key actors, we can see change."

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