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Chinese Feminists Stand in Solidarity With the Stanford Rape Victim

Chinese Feminists Stand in Solidarity With the Stanford Rape Victim

Chinese feminists have taken to social media to stand in solidarity with a woman who was sexually assaulted by a former Stanford University swimmer.

The case has since sparked outrage about how sexual assault cases are prosecuted in America. Most recently, the California judge who convicted the former Stanford student and swimmer to a mere six months in jail was removed from another sexual assault case and is reportedly subject of a recall petition.

Now images of women holding up signs with messages of empowerment and justice have been circulated on Weibo — China’s Twitter.




These images have also been populated on Facebook under the group called Free Chinese Feminists and with the hashtag #Solidarity4StanfordSurvivor, or in Chinese #征集照片声援斯坦福被性侵女生.

"As Chinese feminist/queer activists, we can't remain silent in this Stanford case," the group wrote in a statement on Facebook. "We know our solidarity pictures are small efforts. But our message is simple: the Stanford survivor and all the survivors who face injustice, you are not by yourself. We are in this fight together!"

In 1995, MAKER Hillary Clinton made waves in China with her speech during the UN's Fourth Conference on Women in Beijing and she later called out President Xi Jinping for his "shameless" persecution of women's rights activists.

But the abuse of women's rights continues.

Just last year in China, police detained five women for more than a month for organizing a peaceful protest against sexual harassment. 

NEXT: This Painter Addresses Sexual Harassment In the Most Creative Way »

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Photo Credit: Free Chinese Feminists/Facebook