Women Who Write: Female Editors-in-Chief You Need to Know

These women know a thing or two about words.

To celebrate the leading women in the field of journalism, MAKERS has compiled a list of female editors-in-chief you definitely want to know about. These women have dominated the journalism industry, making great strides in the world of news by becoming strong, driven bosses. 

They have entered the magazine industry with ideas and goals, and have gone above and beyond to represent the brands they work for.

Scroll through our gallery above and learn about the women behind some of your favorite magazines.

NEXT: How San Francisco Chronicle's First Female Editor-in-Chief Defied Rejection »

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Photo Credit: Getty Images

Gallery

"I'm fascinated by these young women who are so smart, business-wise and who have an understanding of their brand and the need to protect it and who have control over it." —Joanna Coles Coles is the former editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan and Seventeen Magazine, and is now Chief Content Officer at Hearst Magazines. She works with Hearst editors, overseeing all the magazines under the Hearst name, not just in the United States but internationally. Known for being tough, Coles is a fearless leader and recently left the Cosmopolitan legacy to its new editor-in-chief, Michele Promaulayko. Photo Credit: Getty Images

"I can't help but but excited about the possibility of telling stories of the world to the world." —Lydia Polgreen Polgreen left The New York Times, where she was the associate masthead editor and editorial director of NYT Global, for a "once-in-a-lifetime opportunity," becoming editor-in-chief of The Huffington Post in 2016. In a time of great political change, Polgreen constantly turns to media saying that it is in a moment of power. She describes The Huffington Post as a "truly great global, progressive news platform." Polgreen looks to better humanity and the authenticity of journalism by making it less elite. Photo Credit: Getty Images

"I've always been interested in not just storytelling, but in learning about women's stories, so it seems completely inevitable that I would end up here." —Anne Fulenwider Fulenwider studied English Literature at Harvard University with an everlasting love of storytelling. Jumping around after graduation from Swing magazine to The Paris Review, Fulenwider spent 10 years at Vanity Fair as a senior articles editor claiming that "every job was more interesting than the next." Before becoming editor-in-chief of Marie Claire, Fulenwider worked under Joanna Coles at Cosmopolitan for two years as executive editor, and then went on to become editor-in-chief of Brides. She since has returned as editor-in-chief of Marie Claire. Fulenwider speaks of her love of being an editor-in-chief, using a "change the world" attitude. Photo Credit: Getty Images

Jennifer Romolini, former editor-in-chief of Yahoo! Shine, is now editor-in-chief of Zooey Deschanel's HelloGiggles — a site for millennial women. She has a book coming out June 6, 2017, titled: "Weird in a World That's Not: A Career Guide for Misfits, F*ckups, and Failures." Her advice as a writer shows through her new book as "an outsider whose been there and done it, a woman who went from being a broke, divorced, college dropout to running some of the biggest websites in the world." Photo Credit: Facebook/ Jennifer Romolini 

"You always take the meeting." —Joyce Chang Before Chang became editor-in-chief of SELF magazine, she was ready to leave New York. She decided she was done with print and maybe even publishing. She was ready to move across the country and reconnect with her family in L.A. However, Joanna Coles, who was editor-in-chief at Marie Claire at the time, called for a meeting and Chang went. Taking a job as Coles' executive editor at Marie Claire, Chang then followed Coles to Cosmopolitan until then, at 37 years old, Chang became editor-in-chief of SELF. Photo Credit: Getty Images

"Try asking for equal pay while wearing a baby-doll frock." —Katharine Viner Viner, the British-born writer, was appointed editor-in-chief of The Guardian in June 2015, but joined as a writer in 1997. She launched The Guardian Australia in 2013 but was also an editor of The Guardian in the U.S. She believes in discussing the ways technology has affected the media, and addresses relevant issues in the world — including Brexit and the change of administration in America. Photo Credit: Getty Images

"If you recruit people who are smarter and more knowledgeable than you are, you'll always be learning … and trying to keep up with them." —Martha Nelson Nelson was named global editor-in-chief of Yahoo! after leaving Time Inc. in 2013 where she served as the first female editor-in chief. She oversees all media efforts at Yahoo!, and is known to be an accomplished editor and brand innovator. Photo Credit: Getty Images  

Jones started as an intern at VICE in 2009 before becoming managing editor in 2012, and then first female editor-in-chief of the 20-year-old publication in 2015. Her mission is to "continue to shed light on the underreported stories important to the VICE audience." Photo Credit: Twitter/ Ellis Jones

"Own it, remember it, and make it your motivational mantra." —Elizabeth Goodman on loving your shape in an editor’s letter in SHAPE magazine Goodman is editor-in-chief of SHAPE magazine, the millennial women's active lifestyle brand with a 27 million followers. She joined SHAPE in 2013 as executive editor, but had worked in the magazine industry for nearly 20 years prior. When she's not working, she says that she loves to as much time as she can underwater, scuba diving with her husband. Photo Credit: Getty Images