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Dolls That Inspire Young Girls to Get Into STEM Fields

Dolls That Inspire Young Girls to Get Into STEM Fields

Move over, Barbie — Ms. Possible could be the next most popular doll among girls everywhere.

In 2014, Mattel launched Entrepreneur Barbie, equipped with a smartphone and professional clothing, to encourage girls that they can work in the business world.

As said, "It was a far cry from Barbie's bikini past, but no matter how the figure is dressed up, there's no denying it's the same iconic doll, complete with a body that's unattainable unless a woman has serious plastic surgery."

Imagine a doll that encourages young girls to dream big and inspire them to get into STEM fields — that's how University of Illinois graduates Janna Eaves and Supriya Hobbs developed the idea of Miss Possible, dolls that empower girls to dream big.

"Miss Possible wants to shake up what opportunities girls see for themselves by showing them women who succeeded in many fields. We're starting in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) because those fields are in dire need of more women, but that's just a start! We plan to show girls all sorts of different ways they can change the world. After all, for girls today, ANYTHING is possible!" the company states on their website.

According to, last summer the girls raised over $75,000 through an Indiegogo campaign needed to produce the first batch of dolls.

The first doll they plan to create is a Marie Curie doll first — Curie was a chemist and two-time Nobel Prize winner.

some_text reports that they are plan to add women such as computer programmer Ada Lovelace and African American aviator Bessie Coleman to their lineup of dolls.

Miss Possible also plans to use the money they raised to create a Miss Possible app that will engage girls in science activities.


"We want to show all the girls all the possibilities they have. IT is not about science and engineering," Eaves told the Chicago Tribune.

"We want girls to do whatever they want to do and go for it. We want to convey the message that we can do anything."

NEXT: Check Out the Newest Marvel Superhero: A Super Genius Young Girl »

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Photo Credit: Anthony Harvie via Getty Images