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This American Runner Proves Why You Should Always Follow Through

This American Runner Proves Why You Should Always Follow Through

By Erica Murphy

Even though Usain Bolt has dominated much of the running news this week (yes, he's still the fastest man in the world), a lot more happened at the World Athletic Championships in Beijing.

In the 10,000 meter race, American runners Molly Huddle and Emily Infeld taught us some important lessons on following through and never giving up.

In the last leg of the race, Huddle was in a strong place to win the bronze medal. She could see the finish line in front of her, and threw her hands up in victory. But, little did she know that Infeld was right on her heels, and kicked it into 5th gear to pass Huddle and take the bronze. Watch the video below:

So what can we learn from this? Well, it's two-fold. Whether you're about to close a deal, get a promotion, or pitch a new idea, it’s always important to follow through and secure that victory before you celebrate. And on the flip side, if you're in the grind of closing that deal, getting that promotion, or pitching an idea, never give up because achieving your goals is always a possibility.

But what could be the most important lesson of all? Be gracious, even when you lose. As Infeld and Huddle waited for the official results, they stood next to each other as a team, as a team trying to bring success for their country. And when Huddle saw that she lost, she gave her winning teammate a congratulatory hug. So there you have it, three important lessons to take with you this week at work.

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