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New MAKERS: Ai-jen Poo, Mae O'Malley, and Shelly Lazarus

Whether at the top of a business, or a non-profit, the women we’ve launched this week are leaders in their fields.
Ai-jen Poo was recently featured in Time Magazine as one of “The 100 Most influential People in the World.” In her profile for Time, journalist, activist and MAKER, Gloria Steinem, referred to Ai-jen as “a gifted organizer…who knows how to create social change from the bottom up.” As a student at Columbia University, Poo became enraged at the stories she was hearing from domestic workers, often immigrant women, who labored long hours with few labor laws regulating their employment. She is now the Director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, an organization that seeks to empower and organize domestic workers across 19 cities and 11 states. Find out more about Ai-jen by going to her profile.  Discover why she wants to celebrate the victories, and why she thinks love is the driving force for change.
When Shelly Lazarus graduated from Smith College in 1968, there were few opportunities for women in business that didn’t involve becoming a man’s secretary. She decided to change her fate, and enrolled in Columbia University’s MBA program, where she was one of only four women in her class. Her passion for marketing and brand building led her to Ogilvy & Mather, making her one of the few women in the ad industry working on the accounts side of the business. In 1996, Lazarus was named CEO of Ogilvy & Mather, and Chairman in 2012. Find out more about how Lazarus lets go of the little things, and why she loves her work.
When San Francisco attorney, Mae O’Malley, got pregnant, she realized she needed to find a way to balance work with the needs of her growing family. She took an in-house contract position at Google, which gave her the flexibility she needed. She continued to perform this type of law, before she needed to hire more lawyers to handle her increasing workflow. More than five years later, her company Paragon Legal, employs over 50 lawyers, offering part-time contract work to senior attorneys who require job flexibility. Discover Mae O’Malley’s philosophy on life, how she responds to her employees’ needs, and how she feels about being the boss.