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New MAKERS: Alice Walker and Meg Whitman

Today we launched interviews with two new women on Alice Walker and Meg Whitman.  Both women are celebrated the world-over in their respective fields, and are incredibly deserving of these accolades.
Alice Walker won the Pulitzer-Prize award for Fiction and the National Book Award  in 1983 for her novel The Color Purple (1982).  This novel was later adapted into an Academy Award nominated film and a Tony Award nominated musical of the same name. Walker was born in Eatonton, Georgia, the youngest of eight children. Her parents were sharecroppers living under the Jim Crow laws in the south, and they desperately sought ways to make a better, and more equitable, life for their children. Walker used many of the experiences of her parents and grandparents in her writing, seeking to give a voice to the disenfranchised black population in America’s Southern states. Find out more about Alice Walker by going to her profile, and discover her thoughts on the civil rights movement, feminism and family.
Meg Whitman is a business executive currently serving as the President and CEO of Hewlett-Packard. Prior to this she led eBay from 1998-2008, before retiring to run for Governor of California in February of 2009, an election she eventually lost to Jerry Brown. Whitman oversaw incredible expansion during her tenure at eBay. Under her leadership the company grew from 30 employees to 15,000, and reported an annual revenue of $8 billion, up from the $4 million in revenues reported by eBay when Whitman first arrived in 1998.  Even before her career had really begun, Whitman was a trailblazer.  She was the fourth class of women admitted to Princeton University, and the first class to successfully finish all four years of the degree. Find out more about Meg Whitman by going to her profile, where she discusses her leadership style, entrepreneurship and women in technology.