New York City's Girl Scout Troop 6000 Is the First Designated for Homeless Girls

Girl Scouts of America began in Georgia in 1912 when Juliette Gordon Low "envisioned an organization that would prepare girls to meet their world with courage, confidence, and character."

For over a century, the Girl Scouts organization has adapted to the changing world, while still promoting the same mission of preparing and encouraging young girls to live their best lives.

Today, in addition to their badges for various activities outdoors, the girls can also earn a Google "Made with Code" badge and you can now order the coveted Girl Scout Cookies online through their Digital Cookie program.

But, what may be the most remarkable development of recent times is the creation of a troop in New York City: Girl Scout Troop 6000.

"Troop 6000 is a Girl Scout troop specially designed to serve girls in the New York City Shelter System," the Girl Scouts of Greater New York site reads, emphasizing its long-term goal of expanding the program throughout the Big Apple "so that each week, on the same day and at the same time, Troop 6000 will meet in shelters across the city."

According to the site, the troop will allow homeless girls throughout New York City to develop consistency and community as other troops do and the leaders are able to "develop skills in communication, organization, presentation, and more."

With the help of Girl Scout Troop 6000, and hopefully more troops like it in cities around the world, every young girl is given a chance to learn, love, and grow.

 

Like all Girl Scouts, the 21 members of Troop 6000 build friendships, learn first aid, go on field trips, and develop leadership skills. Unlike most Girl Scout troops, this one is solely for homeless girls. Troop 6000 is the first in New York City designated solely for homeless girls. All of the members live at the Sleep Inn, where the city has taken over all 10 floors to accommodate about 100 homeless families. Although the new troop emerged from unfortunate circumstances, they’re hoping their new sisterhood inspires more to join them and make a difference – "We’re starting a chain reaction. Hopefully, in the next couple years, there will be more Girl Scout troops in shelters.” via @nytimes & @girlscoutsnyc

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Photo Credit: Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Girl Scouts of the USA

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