Our Favorite Girl Power Speeches of the Golden Globes

The 72nd Annual Golden Globe Awards marked exciting leaps forward in the entertainment industry, and some stars made a point to recognize those shifts. Maggie Gyllenhaal's acceptance speech for her role in "The Honorable Woman" was especially poignant. 

"I've noticed a lot of people talking about the wealth of roles for powerful women in television lately. And when I look around the room at the women who are here and I think about the performances that I've watched this year, what I see actually are women who are sometimes powerful and sometimes not, sometimes sexy, sometimes not, sometimes honorable, sometimes not.

What I think is new is the wealth of roles for actual women in television and in film. That's what I think is revolutionary and evolutionary and it's what's turning me on."

Earlier in the night, a beaming Gina Rodriguez accepted the first-ever win for The CW, showing that a leading Latina woman can do a network a whole lot of good. Joanne Froggatt was recognized for her performance in "Downton Abbey," playing a maid who survives rape. Patricia Arquette won for playing a single mom in "Boyhood." 

And when it came to best series, the comedy and drama winners ("Transparent" and "The Affair") were created by women. 

Maggie's right: we're seeing a wealth of roles for women, both onscreen and behind-the-scenes. We've got a long way to go, but this is show business progress we can applaud.

Click through the slideshow above for some of our favorite feminist moments of the Awards.

NEXT: See the 2016 Golden Globe Nominations »

Related Stories
Blast From the Past: See the 2015 Emmy Nominees' First Emmys Red Carpet Ever
All About MAKERS' Emmy Nomination

Photo Credit: David Livingston/Getty Images

Gallery

Joanne Froggatt, winning for Best Supporting Actress in a Series, Miniseries or TV Movie for her role in "Downton Abbey": Froggatt acted in a recent storyline in which her character, Anna Bates, was attacked and raped by a visiting valet. “After this storyline aired,” Froggatt said in her Globes acceptance speech, “I received a small number of letters from survivors of rape, and one woman summed up the thoughts of many by saying she wasn’t sure why she’d written, but she just felt in some way she wanted to be heard. I’d just like to say, I heard you, and I hope saying this so publicly means in some way, you feel the world hears you.”

Gina Rodriguez, winning for Best Actress in a TV Comedy for "Jane the Virgin": "This award is so much more than myself, it represents a culture that wants to see itself as heroes." Watch the full speech here.

Jill Soloway, Creator of "Transparent" and Golden Globe winner for Best TV Comedy: "I want to thank the trans community. They are our family and they make this possible. This is dedicated to too many trans people that died too young. It's dedicated to you, my trans parent, if you're watching at home right now. I want to thank you for coming out because in doing so you made a break for freedom and you told your truth. You taught me how to tell my truth and make this show and maybe we'll be able to teach the world something about authenticity and truth and love. To love." Watch the full speech here.  

Patricia Arquette, winning for Best Supporting Actress in "Boyhood," started strong by saying, "Meryl thank you for giving me a hug, I hope your DNA transferred to me.” She continued: "You placed in my hands the role of Olivia, an under appreciated single mother. Thank you for shining a light on this woman and millions of women like her, and for allowing me to honor my own mother with this beautiful character.  Finally, she said, “Most especially to my kids Enzo and Harlow, who I love and respect. My favorite role in this whole life has been being your mom.” Watch the full speech here.

Maggie Gyllenhaal, winning Best Actress in a Miniseries or TV Movie for "The Honorable Woman": "I've noticed a lot of people talking about the wealth of roles for powerful women in television lately. And when I look around the room at the women who are here and I think about the performances that I've watched this year what I see actually are women who are sometimes powerful and sometimes not, sometimes sexy, sometimes not, sometimes honorable, sometimes not, and what I think is new is the wealth of roles for actual women in television and in film. That's what I think is revolutionary and evolutionary and it's what's turning me on." Watch her whole speech.