Newsletter

Stay up to date with the latest from MAKERS delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for new stories from trailblazing women, a big dose of inspiration, and exclusive MAKERS content.

Newsletter Confirmation

Thank you for joining! Please check your inbox for our special welcome letter
with exclusive updates from MAKERS.

So, What Exactly Is Mansplaining and How Can It Be Stopped?

So, What Exactly Is Mansplaining and How Can It Be Stopped?

While people seem to have varying definitions for many terms these days, the verb 'to mansplain' is a relatively recent term with one definition: to point out the sexism that poisons too many conversations among men and women.

Whether it's online or in person, mansplaining happens far more frequently than some may realize and, ironically enough, it even happens when men try to define the term themselves. Some evidence of this can be found upon looking up the word on UrbanDictionary.com.

And no, mansplainer, 'mansplaining' is not "stating accurate, verifiable facts. Especially when these facts are inconvenient to the feminist worldview, or contradict feminist talking points."

And no, ProfessorD, it is not "A sexist term used by misandrist women to disrespect, belittle and devalue the opinion of her male peers in an attempt to make herself appear smarter or better in comparison."

And most certainly no, feministneedDICKintheirlife, it is not "a word used by pseudo-intellectual feminist (e.g. ugly chicks, over 30 single moms with no chance in hell of getting a man their own age, and insecure fat chicks or combo of all three) on the internet to justify their loosing argument and/or anti-male rhetoric."

But thank you anyway — mostly for helping to define the word simply by incorrectly defining it yourselves.

Put most simply, mansplaining is when a condescending male challenges what a female says solely because her opinions or beliefs are deemed invalid and in need of correction because she is a woman and, of course, doesn't know what she is talking about.

Most of the time, these "mansplanations" happen when an opinion or comment is unnecessary or unwarranted. It is not a correction of a fact, but the correction of an opinion or challenging of one's knowledge of a subject because you need to prove you know more (i.e. fact checking a woman's career on LinkedIn mid-conversation at a bar to see if her career is legitimate before proceeding to tell her she's wrong anyway).

The prime example of mansplaining? This response to Astrophysicist Katie Mack's tweet:

So how exactly do you stop mansplainers like Gary? Try what @AstroKatie did — it'll surely shut them up.

NEXT: Sexism Still Exists »

Related Stories:
Men and Sexism
How Search Engines Reveal Worldwide Sexism

Photo Credit: Digital Vision via Getty Images