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How This Teen Feminist Is Teaching Fellow Nicaraguan Girls About Their Reproductive Rights

How This Teen Feminist Is Teaching Fellow Nicaraguan Girls About Their Reproductive Rights

Maria Fernanda Pineda Calero is not your average teenager.

This 16 year old living in Nicaragua is seeking to make an important change in her country.

According to Broadly, in Nicaragua, human rights are being withdrawn from women and girls.

"Women never stop being minors because men always control us. They never let us live our lives," she said.

Girls in Nicaragua are raised in a society controlled by men and are taught domesticity in schools.

Women in the World reports that Calero leads the program Born to Fly, where she teaches her peers about their own bodies and rights.

"I received a sexist education at home," Calero said, adding that school is no better. "We're taught to [be subordinate] from the seating arrangements, with whom we walk in recess, how to play, how to act — in physical education, if exercises require strength they don't let us girls do them."

Calero hopes that education about will inspire great change.

"All women should agree that we want to control our minds, bodies, and reproductive system since knowledge that empowers us also makes us free," Calero said. "Thanks to feminism, and [the] courageous women who gave their lives in the fight for gender equality. Today I understand that as a woman I have a right to political participation, to work, to study, to decide on my body and my life, to build my identity independently and without impositions from any man or formal institutions that dominated society in the past — like the church — or who still dominate today, like the state."

For the full story, click here.

NEXT: MAKERS in the Making: 5 Teen Leaders and Their Goals for 2015 »

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Photo Credit: Global Fund for Women Facebook