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Theresa May Will Become the New British Prime Minister on Wednesday

Theresa May Will Become the New British Prime Minister on Wednesday

With Britain's historic Brexit and Prime Minister David Cameron announcing his move to resign on Wednesday, all eyes are on the U.K. to see how Theresa May will navigate the nation's divorce from the European Union.

Within days power will be handed over to May, known as "the quiet woman of British politics." After the other front-runner, Andrea Leadsom, quit the race to become the next Conservative Party leader early Monday, May was set to be the U.K.'s next Prime Minister. Leadsom said in a brief statement in Westminster, that May was "ideally placed" to implement Brexit.

Tim Bale, professor of politics at Queen Mary University of London and author of "The Conservative Party from Thatcher to Cameron" said in an interview that May has been "sphinx-like" during the heated Brexit campaign — while she was on the side to remain in the EU, she maintained a careful position.

In a speech before the Brexit polling day, May urged politicians to focus on what truly matters instead of debating trivialities. "Let us concentrate on Britain's national interest. Britain's future. Our influence around the world. Our security. And our prosperity," she said.

Here are five things you need to know about the woman who will likely lead Britain through Brexit:

1. She was first elected to parliament in 1997 by her constituency in Maidenhead, a town west of London.

2. In 2002, May became the first female chairman of the Tory party in Britain.

3. In 2010, Cameron appointed May as the second woman to be Home Secretary, overseeing counter-terrorism, prisons, police and immigration.

4. She is the longest serving British Home Secretary in more than a century. May has held the post, deemed one of the most difficult jobs in government, for seven years.

5. If May was elected to lead Britain she would become the nation’s second-ever female Prime Minister after Margaret Thatcher.

NEXT: What Women Leaders Have to Say About the Brexit »

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Photo Credit: Jonathan Raa/Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images