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#ThisDoesntMeanYes Is a Powerful Anti-Rape Campaign Happening in the UK

#ThisDoesntMeanYes Is a Powerful Anti-Rape Campaign Happening in the UK

By Danica Lo

One new anti-rape campaign in London takes aim at the notion that women who wear certain clothing are "asking for it." Created by the activist-aide group Rape Crisis London, the #ThisDoesntMeanYes images feature women wearing short skirts, rep lipstick, sleeveless sheath dresses, and other trendy, skin-baring clothes—emblazoned with the campaign hashtag.

The message is powerful:

A short skirt is not a yes. A red lip is not a yes. A wink is not a yes. A slow dance is not a yes. A walk home is not a yes. A drink back at mine is not a yes. A kiss on the sofa is not a yes. What I wear and how I behave are not invitations. There's a myth that surrounds women, a myth that embroils them: Women who dress or behave suggestively, women who are playful or who act provocatively, women who flirt or openly discuss sex—they're 'asking for it'. It's an insidious fable, and it needs to stop. Every woman has a right to freedom of expression. No woman deserves to be raped for it. No one should be able to blame rape on a short skirt. A short skirt can't talk—a short skirt can't say yes. The only yes should be an active and embodied 'yes!'

It's a good reminder that perception and interpretation and assumption are not reality—and that no means no. Check out more images from the #ThisDoesntMeanYes campaign right here.


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