MAKERS Profile

Connie Chung

Television Journalist

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In Connie Chung's MAKERS interview, the pioneering television journalist talks about her family's move from China to Washington D.C., her first job at a local television station, the rigorous hazing women were subjected to, and how she made history as the first Asian and second woman to co-anchor a major network's national news.
Connie Chung became the first Asian and the second woman to co-anchor one of America's major network news programs when she co-hosted the "CBS Evening News" with Dan Rather. An Emmy and Peabody Award-winning journalist, Chung has worked at CBS, ABC, NBC, and CNN.   The youngest of five sisters, Chung was born in Washington D.C.  A shy girl growing up, Chung surprised her family by pursuing a journalism degree. From there, she quickly launched into her career at Washington's WTTG-TV, first as a secretary, and ultimately as a reporter.   In 1993, CBS announced that Chung would be the co-anchor of the nightly news broadcast alongside Dan Rather. In 1995, Chung was released from her dream job. Since, she has returned to broadcast on "20/20" and her own news programs.   Chung is married to talk show host Maury Povich and together they have one adopted son.

More From Connie

Chinese Americans
Journalist Connie Chung talks about growing up in a traditional Chinese family in America and the expectations her family had of her.

The Stakeout Queen
In this interview, Connie Chung explains from where the nickname "stakeout queen" comes.

More Sexism than Racism
Journalist Connie Chung talks about the double edged sword of being a minority woman when she first started out, and how being a woman, in her opinion, created more challenges than being a minority.

Running into President Nixon
In this interview, Connie Chung talks about the her run-in with President Nixon at the height of Watergate and the strange advice the President gave her.

Sing Your Own Praises
Journalist Connie Chung shares her take on the difference between men and women in the workplace and what women can learn from their male counterparts.

Competition for the "Woman Job"
In this MAKERS interview, Connie Chung talks about how the networks pitted women against each other, especially minority women, for the token "woman jobs."

Best and Worst Parts of the Job
Journalist Connie Chung discusses the aspects she hated about her job and how it contrasted with what she strove to do as a journalist.

Unforgivable
In this interview, Connie Chung talks about men, equality and how "pitifully slow" progress has been.

Reporting from War
Journalist Connie Chung talks about reporting from war-torn El Salvador and how she coped with the tremendous amount of fear.