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Kirsten Gillibrand

Senator (D-New York)

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Kirsten Gillibrand, United States Senator for New York, discusses how she entered politics and public service.
Kirsten Gillibrand is a United States Senator from New York and a member of the Democratic Party. Prior to her career in politics, she worked as a securities lawyer in New York City for more than a decade. As a member of a politically active family, Gillibrand wanted to have a voice in politics, and decided to leave her Manhattan job to work in Washington D.C. as Special Counsel for Andrew Cuomo, then-United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under the Clinton Administration. Gillibrand decided to run for office in Albany, and was twice elected to the United States House of Representatives (2007-2009). In her first congressional election, she won against the four-term incumbent, John E. Sweeney, receiving 53% of the vote. When President Barack Obama appointed Hillary Rodham Clinton as Secretary of State, Governor Paterson appointed Gillibrand to this seat in the U.S. Senate. Gillibrand was required to run a special election in 2010, winning with 63% of the vote. Her most recent campaign, ""Off the Sidelines,"" encourages women to make an impact in politics through voting, advocacy and running for office.

More From Kirsten

Roots of Advocacy
Gillibrand on the family role models who inspired her to enter into politics.

"Mentoring is So Important"
When Gillibrand noticed that her female colleagues were not getting promoted, she wanted to know why.

Keep Fighting
Gillibrand shares the wisdom imparted to her by her mother and grandmother.

A Call to Action
Gillibrand discusses her new campaign, "Off the Sidelines," and what it means for women in America.

Parity in Every Sphere
Only 16% of women aspire to reach the corner office. Gillibrand comments on and tries to explain this statistic. 

Women Can Change America
Gillibrand explains how the United States could raise its GDP by 9%, if women were paid equally to men.

Most Working Parents
Gillibrand acknowledges her privilege in being able to set her own work schedule around the needs of her children.

Vehicles for Good
Kirsten Gillibrand comments on the gender gap that persists in the areas of math, science, and technology.

Setting the National Agenda
With only 17% of congress made up by women, Gillibrand wonders how we can entice more women to enter or engage with politics.