Newsletter

Stay up to date with the latest from MAKERS delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for new stories from trailblazing women, a big dose of inspiration, and exclusive MAKERS content.

Newsletter Confirmation

Thank you for joining! Please check your inbox for our special welcome letter
with exclusive updates from MAKERS.

Husband's Endless Support

MAKERS Moment

Husband's Endless Support

More From Lilly

Watch in Cinema View

In this video

Ledbetter remembers how supportive her husband was in her many year legal battle, and its sad coincidence with the end of his life.

Lilly's Biography

Causes of Choice: American Association of University Women & National Women’s Law Center
Childhood Dream: To become an engineer.
Proudest Achievement: Having a bill named after her in Congress, the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act.
Best Advice Received: “To always be true to myself and honest in everything I did.”

Lilly Ledbetter worked as an area manager at Goodyear plant in Gadsden, Alabama for nineteen years. Her crusade to remedy the gender-based pay discrimination that she suffered during that time received national attention, and her activism led to the passage of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act in 2009.
 
Ledbetter grew up in rural Alabama and began working in her grandfather’s cotton fields while she was a teenager. She married Sergeant Major Charles Ledbetter and had two children. In 1979, she took a job as an overnight shift manager and area manager at the local Goodyear plant.
 
As part of her contract, Ledbetter was forbidden to discuss the details of her pay with other employees. As she approached retirement in 1998, however, an anonymous tipster alerted her to an alarming fact: despite receiving a “Top Performer” award in 1996, she had been making far less than her male colleagues for the entirety of her employment at Goodyear.
 
Outraged, Ledbetter made a formal complaint against Goodyear with the Equal Opportunity Employment Commission. After the company tried to discipline her by assigning her to manual labor, Ledbetter filed a discrimination suit and was awarded approximately $3.3 million in damages (later reduced to $360,000 because of a law limiting a company's liability for damages.)
 
Goodyear, however, appealed and the case ended up in the the Supreme Court, which ruled 5-4 in favor of the tire-maker, saying that Ledbetter had missed the statute of limitations (then, only 180 days from her first unequal paycheck) to file a discrimination suit.
 
Although she never received any compensation for the discrimination she faced, Ledbetter fought to pass legislation ensuring that other women would not have to deal with the same inequities she had. In 2009, President Barack Obama made the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act the first piece of official legislation that he signed upon taking office. The bill revises previous legislation so employees can sue up to 180 days after receiving any discriminatory paycheck.

Related Videos

Sara Lamm
Sara Lamm
Documentary Filmmaker

Sara Lamm is a Los Angeles based filmmaker who has produced, directed and performed in a variety of multimedia performances, featuring audio collage, video and still photography. H...

Susan Wojcicki
Susan Wojcicki
Senior Vice President of Advertising & Commerce, Google

Google Senior Vice President of Advertising & Commerce Susan Wojcicki was with Google from the very beginning when she rented her garage to two young computer scientists: Serge...

Anne Wojcicki
Anne Wojcicki
Co-Founder and CEO, 23andMe

With a hope to empower consumers with access to their own genetic information and change the face of health care, Anne Wojcicki co-founded the personal genetic testing company, 23a...

Charlotte Bunch
Charlotte Bunch
International Women's Rights Activist

Women worldwide, “are routinely subject to torture, starvation, terrorism, humiliation, mutilation, and even murder simply because they are female,” wrote Charlotte Bun...